http://tomcanac.com/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 04:11:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 National Forest Ordinance bans camping and hiking on the central coast https://tomcanac.com/national-forest-ordinance-bans-camping-and-hiking-on-the-central-coast/ Tue, 31 Aug 2021 23:58:00 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/national-forest-ordinance-bans-camping-and-hiking-on-the-central-coast/

All of California’s national forests will be closed from midnight Tuesday – and getting caught in one during the shutdown could result in a hefty fine.

This is bad news for anyone planning to explore parts of the Central Coast over Labor Day weekend.

The closure includes much of the Los Padres National Forest that reaches the edge of the Big Sur coast and the interior areas of San Luis Obispo County, from the Cuesta Grade to the mountains along Highway 58.

The US Forest Service announced Monday that it will close California’s 20 million acres of national forests to public access starting at 11:59 p.m. Tuesday.

“By temporarily reducing the number of visitors during this extreme threat, this closure will minimize the likelihood that visitors will be trapped on National Forest System lands in the event of an emergency, reduce the potential for further fire outbreaks at a time when Firefighting resources are extremely limited and will improve firefighter and community safety by limiting the exposure that occurs in public evacuation situations, especially as COVID-19 continues to impact human health and put a strain on hospital resources, ”we read in a press release on Tuesday.

According to the Forest Service order, anyone found in a California National Forest – including hiking trails, driving forest roads, and camping in campgrounds – during the shutdown will face a fine of up to ‘to $ 5,000 for an individual or $ 10,000 for an organization.

The shutdown is expected to last until September 17 – leaving hundreds of people who planned to visit popular recreation areas over Labor Day weekend scramble to find new plans.

On the central coast, the closure means you won’t be able to access your favorite hiking, camping or biking spots for the next two weeks.

Highway 1 is open, Los Padres National Forest closed

Heading north along Route 1 through Los Padres National Forest?

You won’t be able to camp in almost any place north of Ragged Point until you reach Limekiln State Park in Big Sur. (California State Parks are different from National Forests and should remain open for now.)

Most of the trails, starting with the San Carpoforo Creek Trail and heading north along Route 1, will also be closed as it is Forest Service land.

Some of the heavily used areas included in the closure include Salmon Creek, Sand Dollar Beach, and Jade Cove.

Popular campgrounds, including Plaskett Creek and Kirk Creek, will also be closed.

Although Highway 1 itself is not closed, it will be prohibited to turn on a number of forest roads that lead deeper into the Los Padres National Forest during the closure, unless you own property in the area. , have a special permit or are engaged in firefighting Activities.

No hiking, biking or driving in SLO County National Forests

Heading inland, mountain biking and hiking areas such as TV Tower Road along the Cuesta Ridge above San Luis Obispo will also be closed as part of the order.

According to the Forest Service, the TV Tower Road closure begins at Highway 101 and extends to the end of the trail at Tassajara Peak. The Cerro Alto campsite located near Highway 41 will also be closed.

The Forest Service shutdown extends inland into the Santa Lucia, Garcia, and Machesna Mountain Wilderness Areas, which include popular spots such as Big Falls Trail, Hi Mountain Campground, Off-Road Vehicle Zone. Turkey Flat Road and La Panza Campgrounds.

Further south, the Los Padres National Forest lands off Route 166 are also closed, meaning no off-road riders can use the Rock Front off-road vehicle area. There is also no camping at Buck Spring Campground and no hiking on the Gifford Trail.

For more information on closed areas, see the US Forest Service map at www.fs.fed.us/ivm.

Related Stories from San Luis Obispo Tribune

Kaytlyn Leslie writes on business and development for The San Luis Obispo Tribune. Hailing from Nipomo, she also covers municipal governments and events in the South County area including Arroyo Grande, Pismo Beach, and Grover Beach. She joined The Tribune in 2013 after graduating in journalism from Cal Poly.


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]]> Mount Magalloway is worth a detour | Hiking news https://tomcanac.com/mount-magalloway-is-worth-a-detour-hiking-news/ Fri, 27 Aug 2021 22:07:00 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/mount-magalloway-is-worth-a-detour-hiking-news/

Is it worth the nearly 140 miles to climb a 0.8 mile trail to the top of a mountain with some nice views? In this case, yes. A few years ago, I traveled north with my friend Carl to climb Mount Magalloway (3,383 feet), located in the green northern tip of New Hampshire in the town of Pittsburg.

We weren’t making the 52 With a View list, which includes Mount Magalloway and motivates many hikers to climb it today. We just wanted the fun of doing it.

The night before we climbed the mountain on Saturday, we stayed at the Mountain View Cabins in Happy Corner, a neighborhood north of the village of Pittsburg on Route 3.

Also on Saturday after climbing the mountain we did a flat hike along the shallow Connecticut River to the newly built falls on the River Trail. We finished Saturday late afternoon and returned home satisfied.

Going back a day on Friday it was raining when I left Tamworth to join Carl in Jackson and head north, and the traffic was bad. You could say it was a good day to get out of town.

Later, as we drove north, the rain subsided. Next to Jefferson and Lancaster there were blue highlights to the west, and when we reached the quiet section of Route 3 north of Colebrook the late afternoon sun was shining on the low hills and cornfields. It was so green. We saw another car every few minutes.

Finally, we got to Happy Corner and settled into a cabin. Across the street there was a store with everything and a restaurant called Happy Corner Café.

The next morning, there were a lot of cumulus clouds, but also a lot of sun. A brisk breeze blew the leaves up as we drove a bit north of Happy Corner on Route 3 and turned east on dirt road Magalloway Road towards a private forest.

We did 5.3 miles on this well maintained road, although there were frequent shallow potholes filled with water. Then a detour to the right onto the rougher Tower Road took us a few more miles to the small parking lot at the foot of Mount Magalloway.

We started the 0.8 mile Coot Trail, a former firefighter access road that has now mostly eroded into boulders and ledges. We made our way to the lawn-shaped summit area, where there is a fire tower and a watchman’s cabin.

The cabin can be rented. Famous views at the top include the 360-degree view of the tower and views found on a short side trail that leads from the summit to the outlook above the rocky, craggy east side of Mount Magalloway.

Who owns Mount Magalloway and the surrounding area? The summit area and buildings are owned by the state of New Hampshire. The mountainside and much of what you can see from the fire tower (minus the skyline, of course) is part of a 146,000-acre investor-owned parcel. The plot is called Heartwood Forestland Six. It has a conservation easement with the state of New Hampshire that does not allow subdivision. It will remain whole and will be used for recreation and wood.

We ran into a family on the way up. The short trail, although difficult, is suitable for most levels of hiking experience.

We reached the summit green, where another family told us there was a constant cold wind over the fire tower. The summit cabin was closed (the fire guard is only there when there is a high fire risk). We put on some coats and walked over to the platform just below the cabin.

The view from the tower – of three states and Quebec – was awe-inspiring. To the north, above Second Lake Connecticut, rose the long ridge of Mont Mégantic, home to Canada’s largest astronomical telescope. As I looked this way, there was a silver lightning bolt on its top. The view to the south, over the endless mountains of New Hampshire, was superb.

Shortly after on the lawn we took the short trail to the lookouts to the east. It was the highlight for me. The lower lookout was a great vantage point to see the east side of the mountain, which descended steeply past boulders and evergreens to a large gray scree of boulders below. At eye level to the east extended an unobstructed view of Maine. Parts of Lake Aziscohos appeared between the mountains.

Earlier in the summer, I had flown with a friend from the Fryeburg airport north to Mount Magalloway. This steep east slope had impressed me then as we circled around the mountain. It was again now, as I sat and had lunch on the edge.

We made our way back to the top and then descended, taking an alternate forest path halfway called the Bobcat Trail. We later returned to Route 3 and turned north a few more miles to the dam on Connecticut’s second lake. This is where the Falls in the River Trail begins, along the Connecticut River.

It’s like a time machine of sorts – witnessing a juvenile river after familiarizing yourself with its older and wider appearance downstream. The Connecticut at this location is about 30 feet wide and swirls over rounded boulders. Deciduous trees create a rounded canopy above. Fly fishermen come from afar, and this section of the river was caught and released.

The Falls in the River Trail follows the river a few yards into the woods. It was inspired by Kim Nilsen, founder of the Cohos Trail, who over a decade ago walked downstream on old fisherman’s trails, trying to find a crossing route for his trail. A mile and a half from the dam, he came across a nice series of falls into the river.

Hence its name. Chad Pepau from Pittsburg oversaw construction of the 2 mile long trail.

Carl and I hiked the trail to the falls, then I continued to the end, and he turned to retrace his steps, he was so fascinated by the sight and the sound of the flowing water. on this section. We met later at the car.

It was 4:30 p.m. and it was time to head south. Below Pittsburg, the oblique light shone again across the fields, under an azure blue sky. Even though it was Saturday night, we had the highway to ourselves.


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Wheelchair Trip: Jordan Trail Highlights Hike https://tomcanac.com/wheelchair-trip-jordan-trail-highlights-hike/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 13:54:13 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/wheelchair-trip-jordan-trail-highlights-hike/ A Bedouin guide takes a moment to reflect on his ascent to Jordan’s highest peak, Jabal um ad Dami. Photo / Juliette Sivertsen

The tall, wide and beautiful Jordan Trail can be a life-changing experience, writes Juliette Sivertsen

A naked woman could once walk from Ajloun to Damascus without anyone seeing her. At least that’s what local lore goes, dating back to medieval times, to describe the dense forest once known to hide parts of Jordan.

Bordered by conflict zones and war-torn countries, Jordan is a haven of peace in the Middle East, shaped by the Jebel and the Wadi – mountains and valleys that seem from another world and give depth , dimension and magnificence to the land.

Today, only about 1% of the land is forested – but existing reserves are home to hundreds of plant, bird and reptile species.

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When international travel picks up and you’re ready to go on a wilderness adventure, hiking the Jordan Trail can be a life-changing experience.

To cover the entire 650 km, it takes about 40 days. But in 2019, I got to taste some of its highlights, with a shortened 10-day itinerary with World Expeditions. The expedition took us across the country, staying at local guesthouses, hotels and Bedouin camps along the way, experiencing the best Jordanian hospitality.

Here are some of the highlights of the hiking trails to inspire you for future adventures.

Hiking Trails in Jordan

Ajloun Forest Reserve

Before Covid, Ajloun was to be one of the next big hiking destinations in Jordan. The city is marked by the 12th century Ajloun Castle, one of the few Muslim castles in Jordan built to defend against the Crusaders.

Twenty minutes from these historic ruins is Ajloun Forest Reserve, known for its fertile soil and picnic spots. From our cabins in the woods, trails wind through and around oaks, pines, pomegranate trees and wild pistachio trees.

Inside the 12th-century Ajloun Castle, one of the few Muslim castles in Jordan built to defend against the Crusaders.  Photo / Juliette Sivertsen
Inside the 12th-century Ajloun Castle, one of the few Muslim castles in Jordan built to defend against the Crusaders. Photo / Juliette Sivertsen

We did a nice short sunset hike along the Roe Deer Trail in cooler weather in the evening, but there are longer hikes in the park including a more difficult hike to Ajloun Castle.

From the highest peaks in the reserve, views stretch into the distance over the hills and highlands of Ajloun, with the distant haze of the capital Amman clinging to the colors of sunset to dusk.

Bergesh Forest

It is the largest forest in Jordan at 25,000 km² but it is also young – only 150 years old, created to rejuvenate the land that had lost its green cover.

The hike in Bergesh Forest is rated as “medium” difficulty, and our hike was 8km. Our man-turned military trek guide Mohammed took us along dry riverbeds and near oaks, apple trees and maples, avoiding giant holes in the earth, where people tried to dig to find antique gold.

The trail through the forest of Bergesh, Jordan.  Photo / Juliette Sivertsen
The trail through the forest of Bergesh, Jordan. Photo / Juliette Sivertsen

Digging up and taking antiquities is considered a serious crime for this archaeologically rich nation, with penalties equal to those imposed on drug traffickers. What lies beneath the earth is considered to belong to all the people of Jordan, not to one individual.

The last stage of the hike passes through the ruins of a Roman cemetery with around 500 graves, indicating a settlement of around 1,500, who lived here around 2,000 years ago. At the end, we found shade under an oak tree until our transport arrived.

We were taken back to Mohammed’s village in Orjam, where his wife, Maisoun, runs a host family for Jordan Trail travelers and hikers. She’s cooked up a feast of Middle Eastern food for hungry hikers.

Wadi Dana Trail

The Dana Biosphere Reserve covers 320 km², making it the largest nature reserve in Jordan. Formed by water and wind, Dana Canyon is so vast and diverse that it crosses three climates. It has characteristic wild plants and animals of the desert at its lowest point, as well as Mediterranean forests and dry Russian plains at higher elevations.

It is difficult to understand that there are almost 900 species of plants that live here. From our cliff top accommodation at the top of Wadi Dana, the canyon below looked like a vast abyss of rocky, dry and inhospitable land.

The view of the Dana Biosphere Reserve, Jordan.  Photo / Juliette Sivertsen
The view of the Dana Biosphere Reserve, Jordan. Photo / Juliette Sivertsen

But on the slopes and between the crevices, the diverse flora is home to 190 species of birds, 37 species of mammals and 36 species of reptiles, including endangered species such as the Arabian wolf and the spiny-tailed lizard.

The hike through the Dana Biosphere Reserve was the most exhausting of the entire 10 day expedition – mostly downhill for almost 18 km with little shade from the Middle Eastern sun, starting from the abandoned village and stone of Dana.

A word of warning for those with shady knees – the constant descent on a gravel road will leave you in need of an ice pack and a good dose of anti-inflammatory at the end of the day.

Nawatéf trail

Clinging to the side of a cliff, I finally understood the brief at the bottom of my brochure on the Nawatef trail stating “No fear of heights”.

Nawatef is a short loop trail in the Dana Biosphere Reserve and for the most part quite gentle. But the views are wild as the sandstone and limestone rock formations below resemble a rolling field of giant mushroom peaks.

Juliette Sivertsen takes in the views along the Nawatef Trail, a short but challenging loop trail in Dana Biosphere Reserve, Jordan.  Photo / Supplied
Juliette Sivertsen takes in the views along the Nawatef Trail, a short but challenging loop trail in Dana Biosphere Reserve, Jordan. Photo / Supplied

But there are a few moments towards the end where scrambling is a necessity, as well as the confidence in my hiking boots’ grip on the sandstone. Our local guide promised us that the rocks were “sticky” and that we would not fall down a rock face at an apparently 45 degree angle.

Petra

The red rose city of Petra is an archaeological wonder, but exploring its many ruins requires good walking skills.

The journey to the famous Treasury takes at least an hour on foot, past old tombs and through a rocky ravine known as the Siq.

But the Treasury is just the beginning of the wonders of Petra, with thousands of other tombs and ancient settlements from the Nabataean, Byzantine, and Roman Empires waiting to be explored. The hike is mostly flat, sandy, and repetitive with little shade, but you have to climb to get to the Royal Tombs.

Just when you think nothing more could surprise you, comes the journey to the magnificent monastery – via a laborious ascent of 900 steps to the sculpted 45m high facade. But remember, what goes up must come down.

Jabal um ad Dami

We started early in the Wadi Rum desert to reach Jordan’s highest peak, before the harsh sun made the climb too unbearable without risking severe dehydration.

The trip from Sun City Bedouin camp started long before sunrise and it was the only time I felt freezing cold in Jordan.
After 90 minutes in the back of the ute, I snuggled into my party trying to stay warm, the desert finally started to clear up.

A Bedouin guide takes a moment to reflect on his ascent to Jordan's highest peak, Jabal um ad Dami.  Photo / Juliette Sivertsen
A Bedouin guide takes a moment to reflect on his ascent to Jordan’s highest peak, Jabal um ad Dami. Photo / Juliette Sivertsen

The hike itself wasn’t long, but it was the constant scrambling and climbing over the rocks and in the heat that took its toll. We were glad we left while it was still dark, as the early morning sun was still fierce enough to deplete my energy reserves and there was no shelter from the sun other than the rock in occasional overhang to hide under.

We had to stop frequently on our ascent to hydrate, the trip interrupted by spontaneous explosions from our singer Bedouin guide, Suliman.

From the summit, at an elevation of 1,854m, 360-degree views extend over Jordan, the Red Sea, Israel, Egypt and the border with Saudi Arabia. Standing next to the Jordanian flag fluttering on top of the mountain, my cell phone rang with a message welcoming me to the Saudi data network.

Suliman took out a burnt black kettle – the mark of a Bedouin who has traveled extensively – and lit a small fire on top of a mountain to boil the water for our sweet mint tea.

This was our last hike of the expedition and our knees tested us one last time on the way down to base.

CHECKLIST: JORDAN TRAIL

DETAILS
World Expeditions’ 10-day Jordan Trail Highlights itinerary is priced at $ 5,490 per person, with departures scheduled from March 2022. For more information, visit worldexpeditions.com


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FLESHGOD singer APOCALYPSE seriously injured during climbing https://tomcanac.com/fleshgod-singer-apocalypse-seriously-injured-during-climbing/ Tue, 24 Aug 2021 12:49:27 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/fleshgod-singer-apocalypse-seriously-injured-during-climbing/

Italian symphonic death metal band Fleshgod Apocalypse have released the following statement:

“Last Saturday, August 21, our singer Francesco Paoli was seriously injured while climbing the Gran Sasso mountains in Abruzzo, Italy. Despite several fractures, Francesco is currently stable in a local hospital while receiving treatment for his injuries.

In light of this, Fleshgod Apocalypse is being forced to cancel his Cremona, Italy show at Road To Luppolo scheduled for Sunday 29. More details will be shared as soon as we have more information available. “

The organizers of the Road To Luppolo festival have issued their own press release:

“Dear Luppoliens, we have a double news for you: the first is that unfortunately Fleshgod Apocalypse will not be able to be there due to a bad fall during a hike by the leader Francesco Paoli who is not in such a state as we may face a show, at least for the next few weeks. We are so sorry but we understand the situation and wish Francesco a quick and optimal recovery.

We did not waste a second to be able to offer you a show that puts in the spotlight such as Fleshgod Apocalypse, and thanks to our collaboration with Bagana we can officially announce the presence of the Genus Ordinis Dei.

Recently sold out at the Legend Club in Milan, with three active studio records and impressive credibility on the live front, Genus Ordinis Dei will literally dust off the evening of Sunday, August 29. After as planned, the concert of Nervosa and the closing of Jinjer.

Book your tickets here. “



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MOUNTAINEERING: NEVER LOOK DOWN – Journal https://tomcanac.com/mountaineering-never-look-down-journal/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 02:17:25 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/mountaineering-never-look-down-journal/

In 2018, a video went viral on social media showing a woman in a wedding jorra in front of the mighty K2, deep in the mountains of Gilgit Baltistan, surrounded by porters singing wedding songs. This woman was Naila Kiani. And it was his first big trek.

Fast forward three years, and Naila is now the first Pakistani woman to reach a peak of 8,000m in Pakistan – Gasherbrum II (8,035m). She peaked with Sirbaz Khan, for whom it was her eighth 8,000m peak, and Ali Raza Sadpara, a local legend who has now officially climbed 8,000m peaks 16 times, more than n any Pakistani living or deceased.

“A year after that [K2 base camp trek], I started to think seriously about climbing, ”she told me over the phone. Naila is looking forward to a return flight to Dubai, where she is currently based.

Naila is an avid sportswoman – she is a trained boxer, a climber and she runs for fun. But her transition to a great mountaineer was done fairly quickly and against all odds.

“I did research for two years,” she says of her obsession with the mountains and mountaineering. “I was training but… then I got pregnant. It was okay, it was the year of Covid-19. Not much has happened. I rested for two months after giving birth, then I trained for four months. And then it was time to go. Just like that.

Naila Kiani became the first Pakistani woman to climb an 8,000m mountain in Pakistan. Incredibly, this was the first great mountain she climbed. She shares her experience with Eos

Right after having a baby, I ask incredulously. “Yes,” Naila laughs. “My daughter was six months old when I left for base camp and 7.5 months old when I reached the top of Gasherbrum II.”

But the shocks don’t stop there. Most climbers spend their time conquering smaller peaks before attempting larger ones, but, according to Naila, “this is the first mountain I have ever climbed.”

What made her so confident that she could climb an 8,000m on her first mountaineering attempt? “I did the Gondogoro La Pass [en route the return from the K2 base camp trek] which was at an altitude of 5850 m. I can feel how my body is doing and my body has worked well at close to 6000m.

So, naturally, she first decided to aim for a summit of 7,000m. But the time it took to reach a peak of 7,000m was the same as a peak of 8,000m, or four to six weeks. In addition, it was only 1000 m more. But that’s a thousand yards from the death zone (when the air has so much less oxygen, your cells literally start to die), I remind him. “This is the biggest challenge I can take on! ” she laughs.

Although she was training for an 8,000m summit, Naila didn’t really believe she would make it to the top. “I was just thinking about pushing myself as far as I could go,” she says. “Mentally, I knew I wouldn’t give up quickly because in boxing, I wouldn’t give up. I lost badly in one of the fights, but I didn’t give up and kept going until the last lap. I knew it myself. I would give everything to the end. So I knew I was mentally strong at boxing. I was conditioning myself physically.

Naila Kiani in front of K2 in 2018 | Instagram

Normally, when trying to pick an “easy” (still incredibly difficult) 8,000m peak in Pakistan, climbers go for Broak Peak (8,047m). Why did she choose Gasherbrum II (G2)?

“[Because] Sirbaz [Khan] was doing G2, ”she says. “I’m not a professional mountaineer and I didn’t know what the other teams would look like. So, I decided to go with someone I knew. Sirbaz had a great team with him.

Having the right team helped; Sirbaz would have more than its share of work to do on Gasherbrum II. “The ropes had not been attached to G2,” says Naila. “Normally, Nepalese sherpas [along with local guides] attach the ropes to the mountains for expeditions. But we didn’t have one on G2. So Sirbaz Khan and Ali Raza Sadpara were also fixing the ropes. ”

Smiling photos from the summit hide the insurmountable effort it takes just to reach the top and return safely. You are pushed to your limits – physically and emotionally – and onto hostile ground, where you are constantly at risk of dying. “The longest day was summit day,” says Naila. “[We climbed for] 17 hours.

At very high altitudes, due to thin air and lack of oxygen, it is difficult to eat and it is even more difficult to sleep. When the time came for their push to the top, Naila and the team hadn’t slept or ate properly for three days.

“We only had three hours to sleep, but we couldn’t,” she says. “We left at 2 am and it took us 17 hours to get from Camp 3 to the top and back. The next day, getting off Camp 3 was also very exhausting. We were almost dead when we got to base camp.

As a novice mountaineer, Naila observed firsthand how the altitude affected other mountaineers. “After about 8000m the death zone begins,” she said, “There was not much distance. [35m] left. But I saw the other climbers. Some were crawling. Others abandoned 100m before the summit. I couldn’t understand it, they were so close.

Their summit also carried an additional risk: there were no fixed ropes after about 7,536 m. “It was my first summit, so I had no idea it wasn’t normal,” says Naila. “We had to use safety ropes attached to each other and we had to move really fast. It was very risky. If one fell, the others would fall too… it wasn’t easy.

“A lot of other climbers were shocked. It never happened in Nepal [where the ropes are fixed all the way to the summit]. Our team repaired most of the ropes. And the foreigners didn’t help much. Sirbaz said he thinks it is more difficult than Everest. Because [in addition to climbing] he had to fix the ropes for everyone.

At the top, Naila was faced with incredible views that only a select few can see – above the clouds, in one of the 14 highest points on Earth, being able to see both China and India. “I was very dizzy,” says Naila. “How did it happen? I’m the least experienced person here. I couldn’t believe I could have made it to the top. It was like a dream.”

This level was not pure, however. “I was so exhausted. I didn’t really appreciate it. In addition, it was too windy. The team was very uncomfortable. We wanted to go down very quickly.

As she climbed to the top of the G2, there were at least five other women from Pakistan attempting other 8,000m peaks at the same time. They did not succeed. When Naila finally arrived at base camp, she discovered that she had set a record: she had become the first Pakistani woman to climb an 8,000m mountain in Pakistan.

“I never even thought about making a record or anything,” she says. “I don’t really care about that. I just wanted to test my body.

And what does she plan for the future? “When I left for this expedition, I thought about trying to climb an 8000m then dekha jaey ga [we’ll see], says Naïla. “I certainly didn’t think I would go to another peak, but now I am! “

Here is wishing him good luck in conquering more heights and beyond.

The writer is a staff member She tweets @madeehasyed

Posted in Dawn, EOS, August 22, 2021



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Family found dead on hiking trail: Toxic algae blooms seen in death of Ellen Chung, John Gerrish, baby Miju, dog https://tomcanac.com/family-found-dead-on-hiking-trail-toxic-algae-blooms-seen-in-death-of-ellen-chung-john-gerrish-baby-miju-dog/ Sat, 21 Aug 2021 14:48:45 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/family-found-dead-on-hiking-trail-toxic-algae-blooms-seen-in-death-of-ellen-chung-john-gerrish-baby-miju-dog/ MARIPOSA COUNTY, Calif .– Investigators wonder if toxic algal blooms or other hazards may have contributed to the deaths of a northern California couple, their baby and the family’s dog on a trail isolated hike, authorities said.

The area of ​​the Sierra National Forest where the bodies were found on Tuesday had been treated as a hazardous materials site after concerns were raised over deaths linked to potentially toxic gases from nearby old mines.

But the hazardous materials declaration was lifted on Wednesday, and Mariposa County Sheriff Jeremy Briese said he didn’t believe mines were a factor, the Fresno Bee reported Thursday.

“This is a very unusual and unique situation,” said Kristie Mitchell, spokesperson for the sheriff’s office. “There was no sign of trauma, no obvious cause of death. There was no suicide note.”

John Gerrish, his wife, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old daughter, Miju, and their dog were all found dead on a hiking trail near Hite’s Cove in the Sierra National Forest. A family friend had reported their disappearance Monday evening.

The area around Hite’s Cove was the site of a hard rock gold mining operation in the mid-19th century.

The bodies were taken to the Mariposa coroner’s office for autopsies and toxicology exams, Mitchell said.

The state’s Water Resources Control Board said Thursday it was testing the region’s waterways for any toxic algal blooms.

The couple were known to be avid hikers. Their friend, Mariposa’s real estate agent, Sidney Radanovich, said Gerrish was a San Francisco-based software designer who, along with his wife, “fell in love with the Mariposa area” and bought several homes there, one residence for themselves and rental investments.

“They were such a loving couple. They loved each other a little bit,” Radanovich told the San Francisco Chronicle. “He liked to show the baby all kinds of things and explain them to him.”

The sheriff’s office was investigating the deaths with the California Department of Justice.

Sheriff Jeremy Briese said chaplains and staff are counseling family members.

“My heart is breaking for their family,” he said.

The remote area where the bodies were found did not have mobile phone service, Mitchell said. The hiking trail crossed an area of ​​forest known especially in spring for its spectacular wild flowers.

Copyright © 2021 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved.


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Ken Stanton of Angwin Reflects on Life of Rock Climbing in New Book | Lifestyles https://tomcanac.com/ken-stanton-of-angwin-reflects-on-life-of-rock-climbing-in-new-book-lifestyles/ Thu, 19 Aug 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/ken-stanton-of-angwin-reflects-on-life-of-rock-climbing-in-new-book-lifestyles/

“Visiting the Karakoram, just being there, was enough,” he said.

Instead of the Himalayan giants, Stanton’s life ambition was to climb the menacing northwest face of the Half Dome. It took him five tries over a 25-year period, but he finally did it in 2004.

He had just climbed the even more intimidating El Capitan, which he calls “the greatest thing I have ever done”. Half Dome, with its abundant ledges and cracks, felt like a relative walk, even though it was the culmination of a lifelong dream.

“It’s okay to have a completely sleepless night before a big climb, wondering if you’re going to die the next day,” Stanton said. “But there were no sleepless nights before Half Dome. I was so relaxed. It was just pure fun.

Now 70, Stanton quit climbing tall walls 16 years ago, but he still enjoys moderate-difficulty climbs like Mount St. Helena, the Eastern Sierra and Lover’s Leap near Tahoe.

“I don’t push my limits anymore,” he said. “It’s just about having fun now. “

“No Mere Passtime” is Stanton’s fourth book, following the books on “Mount St. Helena & RL Stevenson State Park: A History and Guide”, “Great Day Hikes In & Around Napa Valley” and “Napa Valley Picnic: A California Wine Country Travel Companion, ”which he co-wrote with Jack Burton.


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Ken Stanton of Angwin Reflects on Life of Rock Climbing in New Book | Lifestyles https://tomcanac.com/ken-stanton-of-angwin-reflects-on-life-of-rock-climbing-in-new-book-lifestyles-2/ Wed, 18 Aug 2021 01:30:00 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/ken-stanton-of-angwin-reflects-on-life-of-rock-climbing-in-new-book-lifestyles-2/

“Visiting the Karakoram, just being there, was enough,” he said.

Instead of the giants of the Himalayas, Stanton’s life ambition was to climb the menacing northwest face of the Half Dome. It took him five tries over a 25-year period, but he finally did it in 2004.

He had just climbed the even more intimidating El Capitan, which he calls “the greatest thing I have ever done”. Half Dome, with its abundant ledges and cracks, felt like a relative walk, even though it was the culmination of a lifelong dream.

“It’s okay to have a completely sleepless night before a big climb, wondering if you’re going to die the next day,” Stanton said. “But there were no sleepless nights before Half Dome. I was so relaxed. It was just pure fun.

Now 70, Stanton quit climbing tall walls 16 years ago, but still enjoys moderate-difficulty climbs like Mount St. Helena, the Eastern Sierra and Lover’s Leap near Tahoe.

“I don’t push my limits anymore,” he said. “It’s just about having fun now. “

“No Mere Passtime” is Stanton’s fourth book, following the books on “Mount St. Helena & RL Stevenson State Park: A History and Guide”, “Great Day Hikes In & Around Napa Valley” and “Napa Valley Picnic: A California Wine Country Travel Companion, ”which he co-wrote with Jack Burton.


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First of all, rock climbing has become a hobby during a pandemic. Then it became a fashion moment https://tomcanac.com/first-of-all-rock-climbing-has-become-a-hobby-during-a-pandemic-then-it-became-a-fashion-moment/ Tue, 17 Aug 2021 15:40:52 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/first-of-all-rock-climbing-has-become-a-hobby-during-a-pandemic-then-it-became-a-fashion-moment/

Over the past few months, it seems every man in a hip New York neighborhood is wearing a pair of Patagonia bags or loose cargo pants with a plastic buckle around the waist. Or, if you went 20 minutes outside of town for a ‘nature walk’ you would see herds of dudes dressed in comfy but functional hiking sandals, perhaps teamed with a funky bootleg t-shirt with a few facts. on Walter Benjamin on this. If you’ve seen these things, don’t worry. You are not crazy. Everyone dresses like a climber now.

Many of them even climb on their own. Rock climbing, like darning socks and naming your sourdough sourdough, is among the many hobbies people have turned to during the pandemic. (Of course, that was also a time before the pandemic.) But escalation is different from these activities. It’s a solitary activity, but it’s also fun to do with friends. There is something soothing and methodical about finding its way to some sort of Paleozoic piece of Earth, or just man-made Nickelodeon-colored walls.

There is also, not surprisingly, a whole way of dressing for this. Rock climbing is not just a question the climb– it’s also about what you wear to do it.

Designer Spencer Phipps is perhaps the perfect example of this new climber. Phipps, who lives in Paris, set up a climbing gym in his own home just before the pandemic. It ended up being a good move: he used it all the time in the darker parts of the lockdown, and still uses it quite often today. Phipps says he likes how low-tech rock climbing is. When making an ascent, he tends to wear a lot of surplus vintage military clothing. But when I ask him who is the most stylish person he has ever seen climb, he says there was a man in his eighties at a gym he frequents in Paris who had the best cuts he has ever had. never seen. “He would wear those leggings. But he was, like, so skinny and old that they were kind of like loose jeans, skinny jeans or something. It was just a little skinny and droopy, ”he says. “And then he had those salmon-colored Crocs.” And this hat with a pompom.

Erin, who works at VITAL, a gym in Williamsburg, says she can spot climbers around the world quite easily. “I will notice,” she said, “people in the subway with an Osprey bag. You can usually tell this is a very serious climber or hiker. Erin’s favorite rock climbing clothing is Gramicci pants: “I wear them everyday because I can wear them for pretty much anything. They also look super cute, much like a pair of baggy chinos.



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From the Rockies to the Himalayas, this golden museum celebrates mountaineering – Greeley Tribune https://tomcanac.com/from-the-rockies-to-the-himalayas-this-golden-museum-celebrates-mountaineering-greeley-tribune/ Sat, 14 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://tomcanac.com/from-the-rockies-to-the-himalayas-this-golden-museum-celebrates-mountaineering-greeley-tribune/

Every time I walk into the American Mountaineering Museum in Golden – and have visited it on several occasions since it opened in 2008 – my eyes are immediately drawn to the remarkable model of Mount Everest towering over the ground floor. .

An exhibit at the American Mountaineering Museum in Golden contains climbing clothing and equipment used by Jim Whittaker when he became the first American to reach the summit of Mount Everest in 1963.

It is my favorite attraction there, representing to me a symbol of the human spirit. Measuring 12 feet long and 11 feet wide, this is essentially a 3D topographic map with pieces of white polyurethane cut to precise specifications, each one quarter inch pitch representing a line of topographic elevation in five meter increments.

It has special meaning for me because it triggers memories of my own experiences on the world’s highest mountain in 1985. But I would like to think that it can inspire all who see it because of the exploits of the adventurers who have marked the story there before guiding operations ended in the 1990s.

The museum beautifully tells the story of the mountaineering adventure, from the Rockies to the Himalayas. An exhibit from America’s first Everest expedition in 1963 contains a mannequin wearing climbing gear worn by Jim Whittaker when he became the first American to reach the summit, complete with his bag, boots, and crampons. He also has an oxygen mask worn by Tom Hornbein of Estes Park, a hero of mine who pioneered a new route on the West Ridge of Everest with Willi Unsoeld – on that same 1963 expedition – after Whittaker climbed via the Edmund Hillary Road on the Southeast Ridge.

There’s a lot more to love: artifacts that include an oxygen canister from a 1922 Everest expedition and an ice ax that was used to stop a fall of five climbers on the K2 in 1953; a 10th Mountain Division exhibit dedicated to “ski troops” who trained for mountain combat during WWII in Colorado; exhibitions on the evolution of climbing equipment, big wall climbing and ice climbing; a false “crevasse” that visitors can walk through and a “porta-ledge” attached to a simulated rock wall to show how climbers sleep when climbing large walls.

There are beautiful works of art, including 18 Colorado climbing scenes drawn by Jon MacManus for a Colorado Mountain Club history book, and a print from an 1874 painting of the Mount of the Holy Cross, a fourteen from Colorado who rose to fame across the United States in the 19th century.

There are some wonderful mountaineering quotes, including my favorite from George Leigh Mallory when asked a century ago why he wanted to climb Everest:

“If you cannot understand that there is something in man that responds to the challenge of this mountain and goes to meet it, that the struggle is the struggle of life itself, upward and forever up, then you won’t see why we’re going. What we take away from this adventure is pure joy.


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